You may now kiss… the groom?

You may now kiss… the groom?

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Frank Thomas

To my eye there are zero formulas to detect in his work. Every one of his characters moves and acts in a unique way. That way of working takes not only great analysis but a ton of passion.”- Andreas Deja
Source: Deja View
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"…You worry too much, old boy"
Animation by Milt Kahl

"…You worry too much, old boy"


Animation by Milt Kahl

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Robin Hood scene by Milt Kahl which was discarded; Little John dressing in drag running in place, putt’in on ‘is nickers. 
Original Roughs (X)

Robin Hood scene by Milt Kahl which was discarded; Little John dressing in drag running in place, putt’in on ‘is nickers

Original Roughs (X)

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Some beautiful Disney weddings…

(Source: fancysomedisneymagic)

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THE FOX IN THE STORK

Here are some of Milt Kahl's sketches, trying to figure out how the fox's body would fit inside the stork disguise. The position of the legs to manipulate the storks stiff long legs, and the way the arms grab the wings.

In the end, in the film the final result is much more free, without considering this realistic analysis much, but it is interesting to see the logic behind it.

(Source: fancysomedisneymagic)

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Sometimes when people don’t stop talking… know the feeling?

Sometimes when people don’t stop talking… know the feeling?

(Source: fancysomedisneymagic)

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Prince John and Sir Hiss Pencil Test

Ollie Johnston animated this sequence, which introduces the comic villain and his sidekick snake.
Somehow the pencil test seems to reveal more subtleties in the animation than the final color footage, most of us are used to.
This is clean up animation, Ollie’s original roughs were a bit looser. Also, Prince John’s  crown with all its diamonds was finalized by an effects animator. Ollie just drew the main shape of it.
What beautiful dimensional animation!
Pardon the picture quality here, this was part of an old TV show from the early 1970ies.
The clip starts out with the story reel version, and it looks like Ken Anderson drew those sketches. 
Source: Deja View

(Source: fancysomedisneymagic)

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"Now take it easy, Friar. I’m just doing my duty."
- The Sheriff of Nottingham

"Now take it easy, Friar. I’m just doing my duty."

- The Sheriff of Nottingham

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DISNEY FUN FACT- THE 1970s ANIMATION PROCESS

For 1970s Disney films like Robin Hood, The Aristocats or The Rescuers, the visual delevolpment for animating a character was different and quite shorter compared to earlier or later films.
The first Disney feature films like Snow White, Pinocchio or Dumbo had so many artists, who were part of Joe Grant’s Model Department, contributed to the animating process of a single character with sculptures, several ideas, designs and rough model sheets. Nonetheless, after Sleeping Beauty a lot of artistic personal was let go in order to streamline future productions and to save money. So, when the 70s started, the animation staff was reduced to only four supervising animators, who carried all the weight and responsibility.
The process was as follows; Ken Anderson started with rough character designs such as these marker sketches above, which were rich in personality and reflected a sense of who this character was. After that, these sketches would be passed to Milt Kahl's desk, who would, as he'd call it, make them “animatable”.
Model sheets were made up of drawings from Kahl’s early animated scenes…and that was it. No construction sheets, no head or body turn arounds like in the old days, or in later years like they did for films in the Disney Renaissance like The Little Mermaid or Aladdin. Still, the characters from the 1970’s films do not lack any quality compared to others who did go through a more complete transformation.
Next time you are watching one of these films, take a closer look to these characters, but they will only confirm the great talent of these few animators who really took the charge and responsibility and nailed it.
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